A National Works on Paper Juried Exhibition. 6th – 30th November 2017.
Reception: Thursday, 9th November, 6-8pm
Gittins Gallery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

Please scroll down the page for images from the exhibition.

PaperWest is a new National Works on Paper Juried Biennial Exhibition organized by the Art & Art History Dept at the University of Utah. We are excited to bring to our campus, and the surrounding community, a diverse and exceptional range of artworks from across the nation. The exhibition features works in Collage, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and 3D Paper Works. The juror, Willie Cole, an internationally recognized artist, selected 49 Artists, from 26 states to be in the exhibition. Cole’s work has been acquired by many prestigious institutions including: the High Museum, Atlanta, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven.

Selected Artists.
Stephanie Alaniz (WV), A. Bascove (NY), Gary Barton (UT), Therese Bauer (TX), Judith Baumann (OR), Jessica Burke (GA), Catherine Chauvin (CO), CathyJean Clark (WI), Colleen Cunningham (NY), Chance Deville (LA), Mary Farrell (WA), Garland Farwell (AL), Samuel Fee (PA), Steven Foutch (TX), Julie Greenberg (NC), Jayne Reid Jackson (WI), Elizabeth Jolly (MN), Chris Justice (CA), Kevin Haran (FL), Mary Hood (AZ), Christin Hunstman (UT), Paul Leibow (NJ), Camila Linaweaver (OK), James Mai (IL), Katherine McDowell (OR), Karmimadeebora McMillan (NY), Richard Metzgar (NY), Brooke Molla (AZ), Janice Nakashima (CA), Ashley Nason (CO), Kristin Powers Nowlin (KS), Sue O’Donnell (PA), Edie Overturf (MN), Elizabeth Panzer (NY), Duane Paxson (GA), Yvonne Petkus (KY), Laura Post (IN), Fritz Proctor (NY), Jacoub Reyes (FL), Evie Richner (OR), Ramiro Rodriguez (IN), Hyeyoung Shin (MO), Mark Sisson (OK), Katie Darby Slater (FL), Bryce Speed (AL), John Sproul (UT), Glenyse Thompson (FL), Melissa Wilkinson (AR), Viktor Witkowski (VT).

Juror’s Statement

Pablo Picasso once said, “Art is the lie that reveals the truth.” If one accepts this analogy as truth then the next logical question might be “what is a good lie?” Or if we choose to drop the metaphor we might instead ask, “What is an effective work of art?” I use “effective” here rather than “good” because in my personal belief there is no such thing as “good or bad” art. I instead consider art most “effective” when it goes beyond the obvious i.e. story telling and technique, and advance forward onto a higher level of sensory manipulation that is more often than not beyond the artist’s control.

And when faced with the task of creating or jurying art I look for the conscious or unconscious application of the 6 highest faculties of the human mind. Those six mental faculties, perception, reason, intuition, imagination, memory, and will, when employed at any level always, in my opinion, produce a more effective work of art.

The presence or awareness of will, the easiest faculty to identify, gets any artist on the scorecard. Just sitting down before a piece of blank paper with the intention of making a mark is evidence of that. But the other 5 faculties are harder to consciously employ…in fact unconscious application indicates the highest level of artistic proficiency.

So as a juror I looked for these things, even in the slightest degrees. I looked to be surprised, shocked, and transfixed. I looked to be led on a journey, catapulted by your imagination, and led by my memory. I looked to have my sense of perception manipulated, my sense of logic and reason scrambled, and any or all my emotions stripped raw. And if you did any or all of these things in the slightest then congratulations… you are, in Picasso definition, a good liar.